Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Thomas Hardy’

Picture by Barry

Picture by Barry

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Picture by Joanna Kiyoné

Picture by Joanna Kiyoné

Wessex, a large rough haired terrier was Thomas Hardy’s favourite dog, described by Sir Newman Flower as the terror of his life whenever he visted Hardy at Max Gate, Dorchester. Wessex is also known to have bitten the author John Galsworthy.

Read Full Post »

Picture by David Jones

Picture by David Jones

Hardy expert Michael Millgate suggests that this small area of heath beside Thomas Hardy’s birthplace at Upper Bockhampton is the origin of Egdon Heath.

Read Full Post »

Woolbridge House

Picture by Mark Robinson

Picture by Mark Robinson

Woolbridge Manor, a fine 17th century gabled Manor House at Wool. It is to this manor house, as Wellbridge House, that Thomas Hardy brought Tess to spend her tragic honeymoon in his novel Tess of the D’Urbervilles.

Read Full Post »

Stinsford Church

Picture by Mike McDaid

Picture by Mike McDaid

There is no Dorset church more closely connected with the architect and writer, Thomas Hardy, than Stinsford. The church is essentially 13c, although the tower is 14c, the north arcade 1630 and the building was altered several times by the Victorians, who removed the musicians’ gallery and box pews.

Read Full Post »

Portland Museum

Portland Museum by Paulo

Portland Museum by Paulo

The Portland Museum was founded in 1930 by Dr Marie Stopes, its first curator and famous birth control pioneer. It is housed in two thatched picturesque cottages nestling at Wakeham above Church Ope Cove. One cottage inspired the author Thomas Hardy to centre his famous novel “The Well Beloved ” around it, making it the home of “Avis” the novel’s heroine.

Read Full Post »

Thomas Hardy's Cottage by Didier Cornice

Thomas Hardy's Cottage by Didier Cornice

Thomas Hardy was born in 1840 in this small cob and thatch cottage built by his father, a stonemason and local builder. It is located at Higher Bockhampton, a hamlet in the parish of Stinsford to the east of Dorchester and is now maintained by the National Trust

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »